Income inequality in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in Denmark

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Standard

Income inequality in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in Denmark. / Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Foverskov, Else; Andersen, Ingelise.

I: Journal of epidemiology and community health, Bind 75, Nr. 2, 2021, s. 145-150.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Brønnum-Hansen, H, Foverskov, E & Andersen, I 2021, 'Income inequality in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in Denmark', Journal of epidemiology and community health, bind 75, nr. 2, s. 145-150. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2020-214108

APA

Brønnum-Hansen, H., Foverskov, E., & Andersen, I. (2021). Income inequality in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in Denmark. Journal of epidemiology and community health, 75(2), 145-150. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2020-214108

Vancouver

Brønnum-Hansen H, Foverskov E, Andersen I. Income inequality in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in Denmark. Journal of epidemiology and community health. 2021;75(2):145-150. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2020-214108

Author

Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik ; Foverskov, Else ; Andersen, Ingelise. / Income inequality in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in Denmark. I: Journal of epidemiology and community health. 2021 ; Bind 75, Nr. 2. s. 145-150.

Bibtex

@article{08b78515b54e4d67843a225c0354e030,
title = "Income inequality in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in Denmark",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Income has seldom been used to study social differences in disability-free life expectancy (DFLE). This study investigates income inequalities in life expectancy and DFLE at age 50 and 65 and estimates the contributions from the mortality and disability effects on the differences between income groups.METHODS: Life tables by income quintile were constructed using Danish register data on equivalised disposable household income and mortality. Data on activity limitations from the Danish part of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) was linked to register data on income. For each income quintile, life table data and prevalence data of no activity limitations from SHARE were combined to estimate DFLE. Differences between income quintiles in DFLE were decomposed into contributions from mortality and disability effects.RESULTS: A clear social gradient was seen for life expectancy as well as DFLE. Life expectancy at age 50 differed between the highest and lowest income quintiles by 8.6 years for men and 5.5 years for women. The difference in DFLE was 12.8 and 11.0 years for men and women, respectively. The mortality effect from the decomposition contributed equally for men and slightly more for women to the difference in expected lifetime without than with activity limitations. The disability effect contributed by 8.5 years for men and 8.0 years for women.CONCLUSION: The income inequality gradient was steeper for DFLE than life expectancy. Since income inequality increases, DFLE by income is an important indicator for monitoring social inequality in the growing share of elderly people.",
author = "Henrik Br{\o}nnum-Hansen and Else Foverskov and Ingelise Andersen",
note = "{\circledC} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1136/jech-2020-214108",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "145--150",
journal = "Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health",
issn = "0143-005X",
publisher = "B M J Group",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Income inequality in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in Denmark

AU - Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

AU - Foverskov, Else

AU - Andersen, Ingelise

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - BACKGROUND: Income has seldom been used to study social differences in disability-free life expectancy (DFLE). This study investigates income inequalities in life expectancy and DFLE at age 50 and 65 and estimates the contributions from the mortality and disability effects on the differences between income groups.METHODS: Life tables by income quintile were constructed using Danish register data on equivalised disposable household income and mortality. Data on activity limitations from the Danish part of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) was linked to register data on income. For each income quintile, life table data and prevalence data of no activity limitations from SHARE were combined to estimate DFLE. Differences between income quintiles in DFLE were decomposed into contributions from mortality and disability effects.RESULTS: A clear social gradient was seen for life expectancy as well as DFLE. Life expectancy at age 50 differed between the highest and lowest income quintiles by 8.6 years for men and 5.5 years for women. The difference in DFLE was 12.8 and 11.0 years for men and women, respectively. The mortality effect from the decomposition contributed equally for men and slightly more for women to the difference in expected lifetime without than with activity limitations. The disability effect contributed by 8.5 years for men and 8.0 years for women.CONCLUSION: The income inequality gradient was steeper for DFLE than life expectancy. Since income inequality increases, DFLE by income is an important indicator for monitoring social inequality in the growing share of elderly people.

AB - BACKGROUND: Income has seldom been used to study social differences in disability-free life expectancy (DFLE). This study investigates income inequalities in life expectancy and DFLE at age 50 and 65 and estimates the contributions from the mortality and disability effects on the differences between income groups.METHODS: Life tables by income quintile were constructed using Danish register data on equivalised disposable household income and mortality. Data on activity limitations from the Danish part of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) was linked to register data on income. For each income quintile, life table data and prevalence data of no activity limitations from SHARE were combined to estimate DFLE. Differences between income quintiles in DFLE were decomposed into contributions from mortality and disability effects.RESULTS: A clear social gradient was seen for life expectancy as well as DFLE. Life expectancy at age 50 differed between the highest and lowest income quintiles by 8.6 years for men and 5.5 years for women. The difference in DFLE was 12.8 and 11.0 years for men and women, respectively. The mortality effect from the decomposition contributed equally for men and slightly more for women to the difference in expected lifetime without than with activity limitations. The disability effect contributed by 8.5 years for men and 8.0 years for women.CONCLUSION: The income inequality gradient was steeper for DFLE than life expectancy. Since income inequality increases, DFLE by income is an important indicator for monitoring social inequality in the growing share of elderly people.

U2 - 10.1136/jech-2020-214108

DO - 10.1136/jech-2020-214108

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32913129

VL - 75

SP - 145

EP - 150

JO - Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

JF - Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

SN - 0143-005X

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 248545431