Body height and spinal pain in adolescence: a cohort study from the Danish National Birth Cohort

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Objectives
To investigate how body height and trajectories of height from infancy through childhood and adolescence were associated with spinal pain in pre- and late adolescence.

Methods
This prospective study included 43,765 individuals born into The Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) from 1996 to 2003. DNBC-data were linked with health and social data identified from Statistics Denmark registers. Spinal pain was self-reported in both the 11-year- and 18-year follow-up of DNBC and classified according to severity. Body height was measured from birth and onwards and further modelled as distinct developmental height trajectories by using latent growth curve modelling. Associations were estimated by using multinomial logistic regression models.

Results
Taller body height in childhood and adolescence was associated with approximately 20% increased likelihood of spinal pain in pre- and late adolescence among girls compared to their peers in the normal height group. For boys, taller body height was associated with spinal pain by late adolescence only. Spinal pain in pre-adolescence almost doubled the likelihood of spinal pain in late adolescence regardless of body height at age 18. Height trajectories confirmed the relationship for girls with the tall individuals being most likely to have spinal pain in both pre- and late adolescence.

Conclusion
Tall body height during childhood and adolescence predisposes to spinal pain among girls in both pre-and late adolescence, and among boys in late adolescence. Body height is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of spinal pain in adolescence; however, the mechanisms may be related to growth velocity, but for now uncertain.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer958
TidsskriftBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Vol/bind24
Udgave nummer1
Antal sider11
ISSN1471-2474
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2023

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
Open access funding provided by Royal Library, Copenhagen University Library The study was supported by The Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF-7016-00344) and the EUCAN-connect, a federated FAIR platform enabling large-scale analysis of high-value cohort data connecting Europe and Canada in personalized health project (European Commission, Grant Agreement No 824989).

Funding Information:
The Danish National Birth Cohort was established with a significant grant from the Danish National Research Foundation. Additional support was obtained from the Danish Regional Committees, the Pharmacy Foundation, the Egmont Foundation, the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, the Health Foundation and other minor grants. The DNBC Biobank has been supported by the Novo Nordisk Foundation and the Lundbeck Foundation. Follow-up of mothers and children have been supported by the Danish Medical Research Council (SSVF 0646, 271-08-0839/06-066023, O602-01042B, 0602-02738B), the Lundbeck Foundation (195/04, R100-A9193), The Innovation Fund Denmark 0603-00294B (09-067124), the Nordea Foundation (02-2013-2014), Aarhus Ideas (AU R9-A959-13-S804), University of Copenhagen Strategic Grant (IFSV 2012), and the Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF – 4183 − 00594 and DFF − 4183 − 00152).

Funding Information:
The study was supported by The Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF-7016-00344) and the EUCAN-connect, a federated FAIR platform enabling large-scale analysis of high-value cohort data connecting Europe and Canada in personalized health project (European Commission, Grant Agreement No. 824989).

Funding Information:
The study was supported by The Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF-7016-00344) and the EUCAN-connect, a federated FAIR platform enabling large-scale analysis of high-value cohort data connecting Europe and Canada in personalized health project (European Commission, Grant Agreement No. 824989). The Danish National Birth Cohort was established with a significant grant from the Danish National Research Foundation. Additional support was obtained from the Danish Regional Committees, the Pharmacy Foundation, the Egmont Foundation, the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, the Health Foundation and other minor grants. The DNBC Biobank has been supported by the Novo Nordisk Foundation and the Lundbeck Foundation. Follow-up of mothers and children have been supported by the Danish Medical Research Council (SSVF 0646, 271-08-0839/06-066023, O602-01042B, 0602-02738B), the Lundbeck Foundation (195/04, R100-A9193), The Innovation Fund Denmark 0603-00294B (09-067124), the Nordea Foundation (02-2013-2014), Aarhus Ideas (AU R9-A959-13-S804), University of Copenhagen Strategic Grant (IFSV 2012), and the Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF – 4183 − 00594 and DFF − 4183 − 00152). We also like to thank Professor Cecilia Ramlau-Hansen and Nis Brix from Aarhus University for a fruitful discussion on the potential impact of puberty on spinal pain.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023, The Author(s).

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