Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector

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Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector. / Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal; Nexo, Mette A.; Borg, Vilhelm.

I: European Journal of Public Health, 2012.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Sejbæk, CS, Nexo, MA & Borg, V 2012, 'Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector', European Journal of Public Health. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cks117

APA

Sejbæk, C. S., Nexo, M. A., & Borg, V. (2012). Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector. European Journal of Public Health. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cks117

Vancouver

Sejbæk CS, Nexo MA, Borg V. Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector. European Journal of Public Health. 2012. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cks117

Author

Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal ; Nexo, Mette A. ; Borg, Vilhelm. / Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector. I: European Journal of Public Health. 2012.

Bibtex

@article{a6a27ac7f19649698d098545cb1a982d,
title = "Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Western countries are experiencing an ageing and shrinking workforce in the eldercare sector. This study investigated whether 12 different work-related factors are associated with early retirement intentions of employees in the Danish eldercare sector. We tested whether three hypotheses explained the increase of early retirement intention: (i) high job demands (four factors) and low resources (four factors); (ii) low job attitude (three factors); and (iii) high physical strain (one factor).METHODS: We included 2444 employees (aged 45-57 years) from two waves (T1 and T2) from a prospective study. Multinomial logistic regression models showed whether 12 work-related factors (T1) were associated with early retirement intention (T2); very early retirement intention and early retirement intention vs. normal retirement intention.RESULTS: Only 14{\%} of the participants wished to retire at the normal retirement age (65 years or older). High physical strain [hypothesis (iii)] and low and normal affective organizational commitment [hypothesis (ii)] were associated with very early retirement intention. None of the other work-related factors associated with early retirement intention.CONCLUSIONS: Future interventions should focus on reducing physical strain and increase or maintain affective organizational commitment among employees in the eldercare sector to postpone retirement.",
author = "Sejb{\ae}k, {Camilla Sandal} and Nexo, {Mette A.} and Vilhelm Borg",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1093/eurpub/cks117",
language = "English",
journal = "European Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1101-1262",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector

AU - Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal

AU - Nexo, Mette A.

AU - Borg, Vilhelm

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - BACKGROUND: Western countries are experiencing an ageing and shrinking workforce in the eldercare sector. This study investigated whether 12 different work-related factors are associated with early retirement intentions of employees in the Danish eldercare sector. We tested whether three hypotheses explained the increase of early retirement intention: (i) high job demands (four factors) and low resources (four factors); (ii) low job attitude (three factors); and (iii) high physical strain (one factor).METHODS: We included 2444 employees (aged 45-57 years) from two waves (T1 and T2) from a prospective study. Multinomial logistic regression models showed whether 12 work-related factors (T1) were associated with early retirement intention (T2); very early retirement intention and early retirement intention vs. normal retirement intention.RESULTS: Only 14% of the participants wished to retire at the normal retirement age (65 years or older). High physical strain [hypothesis (iii)] and low and normal affective organizational commitment [hypothesis (ii)] were associated with very early retirement intention. None of the other work-related factors associated with early retirement intention.CONCLUSIONS: Future interventions should focus on reducing physical strain and increase or maintain affective organizational commitment among employees in the eldercare sector to postpone retirement.

AB - BACKGROUND: Western countries are experiencing an ageing and shrinking workforce in the eldercare sector. This study investigated whether 12 different work-related factors are associated with early retirement intentions of employees in the Danish eldercare sector. We tested whether three hypotheses explained the increase of early retirement intention: (i) high job demands (four factors) and low resources (four factors); (ii) low job attitude (three factors); and (iii) high physical strain (one factor).METHODS: We included 2444 employees (aged 45-57 years) from two waves (T1 and T2) from a prospective study. Multinomial logistic regression models showed whether 12 work-related factors (T1) were associated with early retirement intention (T2); very early retirement intention and early retirement intention vs. normal retirement intention.RESULTS: Only 14% of the participants wished to retire at the normal retirement age (65 years or older). High physical strain [hypothesis (iii)] and low and normal affective organizational commitment [hypothesis (ii)] were associated with very early retirement intention. None of the other work-related factors associated with early retirement intention.CONCLUSIONS: Future interventions should focus on reducing physical strain and increase or maintain affective organizational commitment among employees in the eldercare sector to postpone retirement.

U2 - 10.1093/eurpub/cks117

DO - 10.1093/eurpub/cks117

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22930740

JO - European Journal of Public Health

JF - European Journal of Public Health

SN - 1101-1262

ER -

ID: 44200005