Hypnotics and mortality – confounding by disease and socioeconomic position

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Hypnotics and mortality – confounding by disease and socioeconomic position. / Kriegbaum, Margit; Hendriksen, Carsten; Vass, Mikkel; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Osler, Merete.

I: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Bind 24, Nr. 7, 2015, s. 779-83.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Kriegbaum, M, Hendriksen, C, Vass, M, Mortensen, EL & Osler, M 2015, 'Hypnotics and mortality – confounding by disease and socioeconomic position', Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, bind 24, nr. 7, s. 779-83. https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.3745, https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.3745

APA

Kriegbaum, M., Hendriksen, C., Vass, M., Mortensen, E. L., & Osler, M. (2015). Hypnotics and mortality – confounding by disease and socioeconomic position. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 24(7), 779-83. https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.3745, https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.3745

Vancouver

Kriegbaum M, Hendriksen C, Vass M, Mortensen EL, Osler M. Hypnotics and mortality – confounding by disease and socioeconomic position. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety. 2015;24(7):779-83. https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.3745, https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.3745

Author

Kriegbaum, Margit ; Hendriksen, Carsten ; Vass, Mikkel ; Mortensen, Erik Lykke ; Osler, Merete. / Hypnotics and mortality – confounding by disease and socioeconomic position. I: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety. 2015 ; Bind 24, Nr. 7. s. 779-83.

Bibtex

@article{a06efd870fa64dafa2ba7f1bc31a9667,
title = "Hypnotics and mortality – confounding by disease and socioeconomic position",
abstract = "PurposeThe aim of this Cohort study of 10 527 Danish men was to investigate the extent to which the association between hypnotics and mortality is confounded by several markers of disease and living conditions.MethodsExposure was purchases of hypnotics 1995–1999 (“low users” (150 or less defined daily dose (DDD)) or “high users” (151 or more DDD)). Follow-up for all-cause mortality was from 1 Jan 2000 to 19 June 2010. Cox proportional hazard models were used to study the association. Covariates were entered one at a time and simultaneously. Results were reported using hazard ratio (HR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI).ResultsWhen covariates were entered one at a time, the changes in HR estimates showed that psychiatric disease, socioeconomic position and substance abuse reduced the excess risk by 17–36{\%} in the low user group and by 45–52{\%} in the high user group. Somatic disease, intelligence score and cohabitation reduced the excess risk by 2–11{\%} in the low user group and 8–24{\%} in the high user group. When adjusting for all covariates, the HR was reduced to 1.22 95{\%} CI (0.97–1.54) in the low user group and 1.43 95{\%} CI (1.11–1.85) in the high user group.ConclusionsThe results of this study point at psychiatric disease, substance abuse and socioeconomic position as potential confounding factors partly explaining the association between use of hypnotics and all-cause mortality.",
author = "Margit Kriegbaum and Carsten Hendriksen and Mikkel Vass and Mortensen, {Erik Lykke} and Merete Osler",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1002/pds.3745",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "779--83",
journal = "Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety",
issn = "1053-8569",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hypnotics and mortality – confounding by disease and socioeconomic position

AU - Kriegbaum, Margit

AU - Hendriksen, Carsten

AU - Vass, Mikkel

AU - Mortensen, Erik Lykke

AU - Osler, Merete

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - PurposeThe aim of this Cohort study of 10 527 Danish men was to investigate the extent to which the association between hypnotics and mortality is confounded by several markers of disease and living conditions.MethodsExposure was purchases of hypnotics 1995–1999 (“low users” (150 or less defined daily dose (DDD)) or “high users” (151 or more DDD)). Follow-up for all-cause mortality was from 1 Jan 2000 to 19 June 2010. Cox proportional hazard models were used to study the association. Covariates were entered one at a time and simultaneously. Results were reported using hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).ResultsWhen covariates were entered one at a time, the changes in HR estimates showed that psychiatric disease, socioeconomic position and substance abuse reduced the excess risk by 17–36% in the low user group and by 45–52% in the high user group. Somatic disease, intelligence score and cohabitation reduced the excess risk by 2–11% in the low user group and 8–24% in the high user group. When adjusting for all covariates, the HR was reduced to 1.22 95% CI (0.97–1.54) in the low user group and 1.43 95% CI (1.11–1.85) in the high user group.ConclusionsThe results of this study point at psychiatric disease, substance abuse and socioeconomic position as potential confounding factors partly explaining the association between use of hypnotics and all-cause mortality.

AB - PurposeThe aim of this Cohort study of 10 527 Danish men was to investigate the extent to which the association between hypnotics and mortality is confounded by several markers of disease and living conditions.MethodsExposure was purchases of hypnotics 1995–1999 (“low users” (150 or less defined daily dose (DDD)) or “high users” (151 or more DDD)). Follow-up for all-cause mortality was from 1 Jan 2000 to 19 June 2010. Cox proportional hazard models were used to study the association. Covariates were entered one at a time and simultaneously. Results were reported using hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).ResultsWhen covariates were entered one at a time, the changes in HR estimates showed that psychiatric disease, socioeconomic position and substance abuse reduced the excess risk by 17–36% in the low user group and by 45–52% in the high user group. Somatic disease, intelligence score and cohabitation reduced the excess risk by 2–11% in the low user group and 8–24% in the high user group. When adjusting for all covariates, the HR was reduced to 1.22 95% CI (0.97–1.54) in the low user group and 1.43 95% CI (1.11–1.85) in the high user group.ConclusionsThe results of this study point at psychiatric disease, substance abuse and socioeconomic position as potential confounding factors partly explaining the association between use of hypnotics and all-cause mortality.

U2 - 10.1002/pds.3745

DO - 10.1002/pds.3745

M3 - Journal article

VL - 24

SP - 779

EP - 783

JO - Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety

JF - Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety

SN - 1053-8569

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 157330596