Do colleagues influence our lifestyle: the matter of smoking, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Do colleagues influence our lifestyle : the matter of smoking, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity? / Quist, Helle Gram; Christensen, Ulla; Carneiro, Isabella Gomes; Hansen, Jørgen Vinsløv; Bjørner, Jakob.

I: Preventive Medicine, Bind 67, 10.2014, s. 166-70.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Quist, HG, Christensen, U, Carneiro, IG, Hansen, JV & Bjørner, J 2014, 'Do colleagues influence our lifestyle: the matter of smoking, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity?', Preventive Medicine, bind 67, s. 166-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.032

APA

Quist, H. G., Christensen, U., Carneiro, I. G., Hansen, J. V., & Bjørner, J. (2014). Do colleagues influence our lifestyle: the matter of smoking, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity? Preventive Medicine, 67, 166-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.032

Vancouver

Quist HG, Christensen U, Carneiro IG, Hansen JV, Bjørner J. Do colleagues influence our lifestyle: the matter of smoking, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity? Preventive Medicine. 2014 okt;67:166-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.032

Author

Quist, Helle Gram ; Christensen, Ulla ; Carneiro, Isabella Gomes ; Hansen, Jørgen Vinsløv ; Bjørner, Jakob. / Do colleagues influence our lifestyle : the matter of smoking, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity?. I: Preventive Medicine. 2014 ; Bind 67. s. 166-70.

Bibtex

@article{a59b170c2e9b466a96c907416fa37607,
title = "Do colleagues influence our lifestyle: the matter of smoking, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity?",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Previous research has indicated that health behaviours tend to cluster in social networks, but few have studied the cluster effect in workgroups. We examined the effect of workgroups on current state and change in three indicators of health behaviours (smoking, body mass index (BMI) and physical activity). Further, we examined whether health behaviours of the respondents at group level predicted lifestyle changes.METHODS: In a prospective cohort (n=4730), employees from 250 workgroups in the Danish eldercare sector answered questionnaires at baseline (2005) and follow-up (2006). Multilevel regression models were used to examine the effect of workgroups.RESULTS: Workgroups accounted for 6.49{\%} of the variation in smoking status, 6.56{\%} of amount smoked and 2.62{\%} of the variation in current BMI. We found no significant workgroup clustering in physical activity or lifestyle changes. Furthermore, changes in smoking status (cessation) and weight gain were seen in workgroups with high percentage of smokers and high levels of BMI.CONCLUSION: We found modest evidence for clustering of some health behaviours within workgroups, which could be due to social learning or selection into and out of workgroups. Future health promotion programmes at worksites should recognize the potential clustering of lifestyle behaviours within workgroups.",
author = "Quist, {Helle Gram} and Ulla Christensen and Carneiro, {Isabella Gomes} and Hansen, {J{\o}rgen Vinsl{\o}v} and Jakob Bj{\o}rner",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.032",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
pages = "166--70",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do colleagues influence our lifestyle

T2 - the matter of smoking, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity?

AU - Quist, Helle Gram

AU - Christensen, Ulla

AU - Carneiro, Isabella Gomes

AU - Hansen, Jørgen Vinsløv

AU - Bjørner, Jakob

N1 - Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

PY - 2014/10

Y1 - 2014/10

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Previous research has indicated that health behaviours tend to cluster in social networks, but few have studied the cluster effect in workgroups. We examined the effect of workgroups on current state and change in three indicators of health behaviours (smoking, body mass index (BMI) and physical activity). Further, we examined whether health behaviours of the respondents at group level predicted lifestyle changes.METHODS: In a prospective cohort (n=4730), employees from 250 workgroups in the Danish eldercare sector answered questionnaires at baseline (2005) and follow-up (2006). Multilevel regression models were used to examine the effect of workgroups.RESULTS: Workgroups accounted for 6.49% of the variation in smoking status, 6.56% of amount smoked and 2.62% of the variation in current BMI. We found no significant workgroup clustering in physical activity or lifestyle changes. Furthermore, changes in smoking status (cessation) and weight gain were seen in workgroups with high percentage of smokers and high levels of BMI.CONCLUSION: We found modest evidence for clustering of some health behaviours within workgroups, which could be due to social learning or selection into and out of workgroups. Future health promotion programmes at worksites should recognize the potential clustering of lifestyle behaviours within workgroups.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Previous research has indicated that health behaviours tend to cluster in social networks, but few have studied the cluster effect in workgroups. We examined the effect of workgroups on current state and change in three indicators of health behaviours (smoking, body mass index (BMI) and physical activity). Further, we examined whether health behaviours of the respondents at group level predicted lifestyle changes.METHODS: In a prospective cohort (n=4730), employees from 250 workgroups in the Danish eldercare sector answered questionnaires at baseline (2005) and follow-up (2006). Multilevel regression models were used to examine the effect of workgroups.RESULTS: Workgroups accounted for 6.49% of the variation in smoking status, 6.56% of amount smoked and 2.62% of the variation in current BMI. We found no significant workgroup clustering in physical activity or lifestyle changes. Furthermore, changes in smoking status (cessation) and weight gain were seen in workgroups with high percentage of smokers and high levels of BMI.CONCLUSION: We found modest evidence for clustering of some health behaviours within workgroups, which could be due to social learning or selection into and out of workgroups. Future health promotion programmes at worksites should recognize the potential clustering of lifestyle behaviours within workgroups.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.032

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.032

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25073076

VL - 67

SP - 166

EP - 170

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

ER -

ID: 132628704