Differences in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and non-immigrants: a cohort study

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Differences in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and non-immigrants : a cohort study. / Norredam, M.; Sheikh, Aziz; Svendsen, K. Dynnes; Holm Petersen, J.; Garvey, L. H.; Kristiansen, M.

I: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, Bind 46, Nr. 7, 07.2016, s. 973-980.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Norredam, M, Sheikh, A, Svendsen, KD, Holm Petersen, J, Garvey, LH & Kristiansen, M 2016, 'Differences in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and non-immigrants: a cohort study', Clinical and Experimental Allergy, bind 46, nr. 7, s. 973-980. https://doi.org/10.1111/cea.12719

APA

Norredam, M., Sheikh, A., Svendsen, K. D., Holm Petersen, J., Garvey, L. H., & Kristiansen, M. (2016). Differences in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and non-immigrants: a cohort study. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 46(7), 973-980. https://doi.org/10.1111/cea.12719

Vancouver

Norredam M, Sheikh A, Svendsen KD, Holm Petersen J, Garvey LH, Kristiansen M. Differences in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and non-immigrants: a cohort study. Clinical and Experimental Allergy. 2016 jul;46(7):973-980. https://doi.org/10.1111/cea.12719

Author

Norredam, M. ; Sheikh, Aziz ; Svendsen, K. Dynnes ; Holm Petersen, J. ; Garvey, L. H. ; Kristiansen, M. / Differences in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and non-immigrants : a cohort study. I: Clinical and Experimental Allergy. 2016 ; Bind 46, Nr. 7. s. 973-980.

Bibtex

@article{a9411a73d92a48ffb76b25ec82b839ef,
title = "Differences in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and non-immigrants: a cohort study",
abstract = "Background: The impact of migration on the risk of anaphylaxis remains unknown. We hypothesized that non-Western immigrants have a lower incidence of anaphylaxis compared to Danish-born. We investigated variations in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and Danish-born including time- and age- trends.Methods: A register-based, historical prospective cohort design. Refugees or family reunified immigrants (n = 127 250) who, between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2010, obtained residency permits in Denmark were included and matched in a 1 : 6 ratio on age and sex with Danish-born individuals (n = 740 600). Personal identification numbers were cross-linked to the Danish National Patient Registry identifying all first-time hospital attendances for anaphylaxis from January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2010. Incidence rate ratios were estimated, stratified for sex and region of birth, adjusting for age using a Cox regression model including the influence of duration of residence and age when residence was obtained.Results: In total 1053 hospital attendances for anaphylaxis were identified: 89 among non-Western immigrants, 9 among Western immigrants and 955 among Danish-born patients. Both male (RR = 0.65; 95{\%}CI: 0.46;0.90) and female (RR = 0.64; 95{\%}CI: 0.48;0.85) non-Western immigrants had a significantly lower risk ratio of hospital attendance for anaphylaxis compared to Danish-born. Compared to Danish-born, non-Western immigrants living in Denmark during the entire follow-up period also showed a decreased risk (RR = 0.65; 95{\%}CI: 0.34;1.25). Compared to Danish-born, non-Western immigrants who obtained residence permission as children had a decreased risk of hospital attendance for anaphylaxis (RR = 0.48; 95{\%}CI: 0.25;0.91).Conclusion: This Danish register-based study using nationwide data revealed fewer hospital attendances for anaphylaxis among non-Western immigrants compared to Danish-born; however this protection was lost over time.",
author = "M. Norredam and Aziz Sheikh and Svendsen, {K. Dynnes} and {Holm Petersen}, J. and Garvey, {L. H.} and M. Kristiansen",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1111/cea.12719",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "973--980",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Allergy",
issn = "0954-7894",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and non-immigrants

T2 - a cohort study

AU - Norredam, M.

AU - Sheikh, Aziz

AU - Svendsen, K. Dynnes

AU - Holm Petersen, J.

AU - Garvey, L. H.

AU - Kristiansen, M.

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - Background: The impact of migration on the risk of anaphylaxis remains unknown. We hypothesized that non-Western immigrants have a lower incidence of anaphylaxis compared to Danish-born. We investigated variations in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and Danish-born including time- and age- trends.Methods: A register-based, historical prospective cohort design. Refugees or family reunified immigrants (n = 127 250) who, between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2010, obtained residency permits in Denmark were included and matched in a 1 : 6 ratio on age and sex with Danish-born individuals (n = 740 600). Personal identification numbers were cross-linked to the Danish National Patient Registry identifying all first-time hospital attendances for anaphylaxis from January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2010. Incidence rate ratios were estimated, stratified for sex and region of birth, adjusting for age using a Cox regression model including the influence of duration of residence and age when residence was obtained.Results: In total 1053 hospital attendances for anaphylaxis were identified: 89 among non-Western immigrants, 9 among Western immigrants and 955 among Danish-born patients. Both male (RR = 0.65; 95%CI: 0.46;0.90) and female (RR = 0.64; 95%CI: 0.48;0.85) non-Western immigrants had a significantly lower risk ratio of hospital attendance for anaphylaxis compared to Danish-born. Compared to Danish-born, non-Western immigrants living in Denmark during the entire follow-up period also showed a decreased risk (RR = 0.65; 95%CI: 0.34;1.25). Compared to Danish-born, non-Western immigrants who obtained residence permission as children had a decreased risk of hospital attendance for anaphylaxis (RR = 0.48; 95%CI: 0.25;0.91).Conclusion: This Danish register-based study using nationwide data revealed fewer hospital attendances for anaphylaxis among non-Western immigrants compared to Danish-born; however this protection was lost over time.

AB - Background: The impact of migration on the risk of anaphylaxis remains unknown. We hypothesized that non-Western immigrants have a lower incidence of anaphylaxis compared to Danish-born. We investigated variations in hospital attendance for anaphylaxis between immigrants and Danish-born including time- and age- trends.Methods: A register-based, historical prospective cohort design. Refugees or family reunified immigrants (n = 127 250) who, between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2010, obtained residency permits in Denmark were included and matched in a 1 : 6 ratio on age and sex with Danish-born individuals (n = 740 600). Personal identification numbers were cross-linked to the Danish National Patient Registry identifying all first-time hospital attendances for anaphylaxis from January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2010. Incidence rate ratios were estimated, stratified for sex and region of birth, adjusting for age using a Cox regression model including the influence of duration of residence and age when residence was obtained.Results: In total 1053 hospital attendances for anaphylaxis were identified: 89 among non-Western immigrants, 9 among Western immigrants and 955 among Danish-born patients. Both male (RR = 0.65; 95%CI: 0.46;0.90) and female (RR = 0.64; 95%CI: 0.48;0.85) non-Western immigrants had a significantly lower risk ratio of hospital attendance for anaphylaxis compared to Danish-born. Compared to Danish-born, non-Western immigrants living in Denmark during the entire follow-up period also showed a decreased risk (RR = 0.65; 95%CI: 0.34;1.25). Compared to Danish-born, non-Western immigrants who obtained residence permission as children had a decreased risk of hospital attendance for anaphylaxis (RR = 0.48; 95%CI: 0.25;0.91).Conclusion: This Danish register-based study using nationwide data revealed fewer hospital attendances for anaphylaxis among non-Western immigrants compared to Danish-born; however this protection was lost over time.

U2 - 10.1111/cea.12719

DO - 10.1111/cea.12719

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26861961

VL - 46

SP - 973

EP - 980

JO - Clinical and Experimental Allergy

JF - Clinical and Experimental Allergy

SN - 0954-7894

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 157724330