Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

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Standard

Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke. / Nordahl, Helene; Osler, Merete; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva; Overvad, Kim; Diderichsen, Finn; Rod, Naja Hulvej.

I: Stroke, Bind 45, Nr. 9, 14.08.2014, s. 2582-2587.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Nordahl, H, Osler, M, Frederiksen, BL, Andersen, I, Prescott, E, Overvad, K, Diderichsen, F & Rod, NH 2014, 'Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke', Stroke, bind 45, nr. 9, s. 2582-2587. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005252

APA

Nordahl, H., Osler, M., Frederiksen, B. L., Andersen, I., Prescott, E., Overvad, K., ... Rod, N. H. (2014). Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke. Stroke, 45(9), 2582-2587. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005252

Vancouver

Nordahl H, Osler M, Frederiksen BL, Andersen I, Prescott E, Overvad K o.a. Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke. Stroke. 2014 aug 14;45(9):2582-2587. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005252

Author

Nordahl, Helene ; Osler, Merete ; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard ; Andersen, Ingelise ; Prescott, Eva ; Overvad, Kim ; Diderichsen, Finn ; Rod, Naja Hulvej. / Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke. I: Stroke. 2014 ; Bind 45, Nr. 9. s. 2582-2587.

Bibtex

@article{f113038f36ed47158445a3812873019c,
title = "Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Combined effects of socioeconomic position and well-established risk factors on stroke incidence have not been formally investigated.METHODS: In a pooled cohort study of 68 643 men and women aged 30 to 70 years in Denmark, we examined the combined effect and interaction between socioeconomic position (ie, education), smoking, and hypertension on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence by the use of the additive hazards model.RESULTS: During 14 years of follow-up, 3613 ischemic strokes and 776 hemorrhagic strokes were observed. Current smoking and hypertension were more prevalent among those with low education. Low versus high education was associated with greater ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, stroke incidence. The combined effect of low education and current smoking was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic stroke incidence, particularly among men: 134 (95{\%} confidence interval, 49-219) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort. There was no clear evidence of interaction between low education and hypertension. The combined effect of current smoking and hypertension was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence. This effect was most pronounced for ischemic stroke among women: 178 (95{\%} confidence interval, 103-253) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort.CONCLUSIONS: Reducing smoking in those with low socioeconomic position and in those with hypertension could potentially reduce social inequality stroke incidence.",
author = "Helene Nordahl and Merete Osler and Frederiksen, {Birgitte Lidegaard} and Ingelise Andersen and Eva Prescott and Kim Overvad and Finn Diderichsen and Rod, {Naja Hulvej}",
note = "{\circledC} 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.",
year = "2014",
month = "8",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005252",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "2582--2587",
journal = "Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

AU - Nordahl, Helene

AU - Osler, Merete

AU - Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

AU - Andersen, Ingelise

AU - Prescott, Eva

AU - Overvad, Kim

AU - Diderichsen, Finn

AU - Rod, Naja Hulvej

N1 - © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

PY - 2014/8/14

Y1 - 2014/8/14

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Combined effects of socioeconomic position and well-established risk factors on stroke incidence have not been formally investigated.METHODS: In a pooled cohort study of 68 643 men and women aged 30 to 70 years in Denmark, we examined the combined effect and interaction between socioeconomic position (ie, education), smoking, and hypertension on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence by the use of the additive hazards model.RESULTS: During 14 years of follow-up, 3613 ischemic strokes and 776 hemorrhagic strokes were observed. Current smoking and hypertension were more prevalent among those with low education. Low versus high education was associated with greater ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, stroke incidence. The combined effect of low education and current smoking was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic stroke incidence, particularly among men: 134 (95% confidence interval, 49-219) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort. There was no clear evidence of interaction between low education and hypertension. The combined effect of current smoking and hypertension was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence. This effect was most pronounced for ischemic stroke among women: 178 (95% confidence interval, 103-253) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort.CONCLUSIONS: Reducing smoking in those with low socioeconomic position and in those with hypertension could potentially reduce social inequality stroke incidence.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Combined effects of socioeconomic position and well-established risk factors on stroke incidence have not been formally investigated.METHODS: In a pooled cohort study of 68 643 men and women aged 30 to 70 years in Denmark, we examined the combined effect and interaction between socioeconomic position (ie, education), smoking, and hypertension on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence by the use of the additive hazards model.RESULTS: During 14 years of follow-up, 3613 ischemic strokes and 776 hemorrhagic strokes were observed. Current smoking and hypertension were more prevalent among those with low education. Low versus high education was associated with greater ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, stroke incidence. The combined effect of low education and current smoking was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic stroke incidence, particularly among men: 134 (95% confidence interval, 49-219) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort. There was no clear evidence of interaction between low education and hypertension. The combined effect of current smoking and hypertension was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence. This effect was most pronounced for ischemic stroke among women: 178 (95% confidence interval, 103-253) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort.CONCLUSIONS: Reducing smoking in those with low socioeconomic position and in those with hypertension could potentially reduce social inequality stroke incidence.

U2 - 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005252

DO - 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005252

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25123220

VL - 45

SP - 2582

EP - 2587

JO - Stroke

JF - Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 9

ER -

ID: 120780348